Are there any Diabetics here?

Cuz I got confirmation yesterday that I am one. Oh freaking thrills & joy.

I guess it really is time to quit treating my body like I’m still a teenager instead of pushing 50.

At least at this point I don’t need shots or pills. Just to make better choices. But heck, that could change after I monitor myself for a week.

My hubby and I are working on our last packs of cigs, so we’re going to try to quit once again.

It’s just a day full of change.:eek;)

So if anyone here is living w/Diabetes and has any advice, I’d appreciate hearing it.

MoonOwl

Type 1 or 2? My Mum is a Type 1 diabetic. I will email her and ask her for some tips for you. (((HUGS))) too because diabetes sucks.

You know Sophie, she didn’t say which type. I had a fasting bs test last week that was 127. So she gave me a monitor and told me to monitor for a week and we’ll go from there. I checked it this am and it was 145. But I had a bowl of rice krispies last night around 10p. Hey, I didn’t use sugar:D

It does suck. My dad had it. He was on insulin injections. Also it runs through his family. His mom died of it in the 60’s and my Uncle and one of his daughter’s has it too.

Nothing like a running into a brick wall to inspire change:willy_nilly:

It seems that’s the only way I ever take action in my life - when FORCED :wink:

Thanks for the Hugs & possible advice Sophie. It’s a brand new day:ninja

Sounds like you are type 2 like my grandma. She doesn’t need to take anything, but needed to make life style changes fast.
I strongly urge you actually make the changes and stick to them because it can change pretty fast.
Start changing the way you east, sleep, the bad habits you have right now.
It’s just all about getting yourself healthier and as soon as possible.

Btw I’m sorry to hear you found this out. But glad to hear it’s something you can control without drugs.

its important that you do change your eating habbits… my friends sis was only in her 20s when she went blind becase she ignored it and ate what she wanted…

drink lotsa lotsa water…change one thing…
it is a life long disease and you won’t change over night…one day at a time…encourage each other everyday.

Yes. I’m Diabetic. It runs in my family.

Contact the Diabetes Association. Click here: American Diabetes Association Home Page

Tons of useful information right there.

Awww… I’m so sorry StepMoonie. hugs :frowning:

Diet changes are important. My father-in-law has it and my grandfather had it too. My grandfather actually lost feeling in his feet and did not know when he hurt himself. My father-in-law it has effected his eyesight.

I worked with a child who was diagnosed with type one when he was 13 months old. A couple of people on both sides of the family have type two.

type 1 is usually diagonised in the early years. as an older adult you probably have type 2. you blood sugar that you mentioned in not really that high. normal range is 80-120. i would follow red’s advice and visit the website. it seems like just some minor food changes should keep it in check.

If you do a little looking around you can find some really good information. There are ways to control diabetes through diet and exercise. There are even some type 1 diabetics who do not need insulin shots because they have controlled it through proper diet.

i am diet and excersize are the main keys.

Got an email back from Mum already. Translated to English it said:

Hello Sophie!
Tell your friend that there are many things to consider with Diabetes. She must take very good care of her feet! I like to put lotion on mine and then put those fluffy socks on when I go to bed. Keeps them warm. Slippers around the house help too. She should see a dietician too. They will help her a lot. She needs to remember never to skip meals! This is very important. She has to get a schedule and stick to it. She needs to become proactive with her health — this includes following and keeping track of her blood pressure, cholesterol and A1c test results. Regular eye checks are vital. As well, tell people! Friends, family. She should tell them what she can and cannot have to eat. Nothing is worse than going to a party and there being nothing available that you can enjoy.
How’s my angel doing?
Love Mummy

Well firstly, I’m sorry about your news.

I have had an elderly diabetic in my family before. He is the poster boy for how not to react to the news since it knocked him back to his armchair (crisps in hand) to sulk for the last 15 years…which has subsequently lead to a triple heart bypass and a stroke!

From the little I know of you, you seem a far more positive person than him. All it really is surely is an indicator of what to do from hereon in, as you alluded to. Its far better to be forewarned and prepared than to have things creep up on you with health

All the very best

[quote=“AnitaBeer, post: 1097544”]Sounds like you are type 2 like my grandma. She doesn’t need to take anything, but needed to make life style changes fast.
I strongly urge you actually make the changes and stick to them because it can change pretty fast.
Start changing the way you east, sleep, the bad habits you have right now.
It’s just all about getting yourself healthier and as soon as possible.

Btw I’m sorry to hear you found this out. But glad to hear it’s something you can control without drugs.[/quote]

Thanks AnitaBeer… I’m glad too.

Wow pinkporridge, that had to suck. I don’t plan on ignoring it any longer.

[quote=“pjbleek, post: 1097546”]drink lotsa lotsa water…change one thing…
it is a life long disease and you won’t change over night…one day at a time…encourage each other everyday.[/quote]

Thanks pjbleek. I tried to respond to your PM but it said you weren’t accepting them? But thanks again and thanks for the info.

[quote=“RedRyder, post: 1097547”]Yes. I’m Diabetic. It runs in my family.

Contact the Diabetes Association. Click here: American Diabetes Association Home Page

Tons of useful information right there.[/quote]

Thanks for the info RedRyder. I really appreciate it.

Thank you sweetie. StepMoonie has been in denial too long :stuck_out_tongue:

AUFred I agree changes are important. I don’t want to lose either my feet or my eyesight. It’s not something to play with any longer that’s for sure…

No fun is it Sneakiecat?

I’m hoping so fuzzwifers. But I miss my Mountain Dew already!!!:willy_nilly:

A search engine is a great thing isn’t it RecklessTim? hehehehehehe… almost overwhelming in fact…

silentbob, the time is now isn’t it?:slight_smile:

[quote=“sophie, post: 1097554”]Got an email back from Mum already. Translated to English it said:

Hello Sophie!
Tell your friend that there are many things to consider with Diabetes. She must take very good care of her feet! I like to put lotion on mine and then put those fluffy socks on when I go to bed. Keeps them warm. Slippers around the house help too. She should see a dietician too. They will help her a lot. She needs to remember never to skip meals! This is very important. She has to get a schedule and stick to it. She needs to become proactive with her health — this includes following and keeping track of her blood pressure, cholesterol and A1c test results. Regular eye checks are vital. As well, tell people! Friends, family. She should tell them what she can and cannot have to eat. Nothing is worse than going to a party and there being nothing available that you can enjoy.
How’s my angel doing?
Love Mummy[/quote]

Thanks so much Sophie! All good advice. Thank your Mum for me would you?

[quote=“Tyler Durden, post: 1097555”]Well firstly, I’m sorry about your news.

I have had an elderly diabetic in my family before. He is the poster boy for how not to react to the news since it knocked him back to his armchair (crisps in hand) to sulk for the last 15 years…which has subsequently lead to a triple heart bypass and a stroke!

From the little I know of you, you seem a far more positive person than him. All it really is surely is an indicator of what to do from hereon in, as you alluded to. Its far better to be forewarned and prepared than to have things creep up on you with health

All the very best[/quote]

Thanks Tyler. I don’t plan on getting depressed. Proactive is better. I’ve been putting it off for too long (obviously).

I spent the day outside starting more seeds and repotting some plants and checking my sugar as directed. I figure I’ll do that for a week and I’ll be in a much better position to know what’s going on.

Did I mention I miss my Mountain Dew already? aaaaaahhhhhhhhhhhhhh!!! I like my liquid posion. I’ll miss it but I ain’t getting no younger and now I’m FORCED to take it seriously:surrender Such is life. Could be worse…

Thanks again y’all. One day at a time is indeed the key. Whee…
MoonOwl

I don’t have it

Just remember to make small changes. Don’t try to stop all of your bad habits all at once.

It took you this long to get where you are… so give it time to turn it back around.

Makes it easier for your good changes to become habits. :smiley:

… and remember… you can have anything you want. Just watch the serving sizes and make it part of your daily total carbs. I figure if I eat really well 6 days out of 7, I’m doing really good. My A1C proves it.

[quote=“RedRyder, post: 1097547”]Yes. I’m Diabetic. It runs in my family.

Contact the Diabetes Association. Click here: American Diabetes Association Home Page

Tons of useful information right there.[/quote]

CUZ YOU’RE SOO SWEET. :thumbdown

I was never properly trained to check his blood sugar (though I did) or give him his insulin (which I refused to do because I wasn’t) but I knew exactly what to look for when his sugar was dropping. And I caught it several times when his regular teachers didn’t (they thought of him as a burden and not as a child). But it’s hard to tell a one year old that he can’t have anymore to eat or he can’t eat the same thing as the other kids because it’ll make him sick.

Family-wise, they’re all able to control it through diet. But they all have their moments of weakness where they slide a little bit. It was sooo hard for my great-uncle to give up Pepsi but he slowly got over that addiction. You have your good days and bad ones, but when you consider that your life and well-being depends on it, you have a lot more good days than bad.

We’ve also had two diabetic cats, both on insulin. We didn’t catch George’s on time but we did with Duo. He now has to be stuck in the spare bedroom or else he starts sneaking food and screwing everything up for his diet and all.