Immigration and the Subject of Boarders

opinions
immigration

#21

I’m with @Sharpandquic on that one. They don’t necessarily want to mold their new home country to be like their old one, it’s more that they wish to embrace their new home land without forgetting their original culture, which is nothing new. Just go down to Arthur Avenue in the Bronx or look at all the Irish pubs around


#22

That’s like saying people won’t do things to make money, and remain with their traditional values. There is no reason for them to westernize in the situation they have been provided; they can simply self-segregate.


#23

You don’t know our history do you? Ireland and Britain ethnically speaking have been opposed to each other for centuries, a major Taoiseach centuries ago before Irelands subjugation said there would never be piece between the Irish and the now called old English living on the island. The old English of coarse transformed into full blown Gaelic clans through the centuries and fought alongside us to the flight of the earls.


#24

Well that was why the Klan and other organisations like that dislike the Irish, however you have to think physically and think of the times. The Irish physically were very hard to distinguish from any other ethnically European man. And at the time, the Civil War broke out where the Irish men fought hard in the worst battles of the Civil War. The Irish really did cement their place in the Americas through blood, and I just don’t see a vast majority of those immigrating to Europe and the illegals immigrating to the US being willing to fight and die for a new country.


#25

I’d disagree. Go into the army and count how many Spanish last names you can find. While some of those are the descendants of Mexicans who lived there before the US annexed the area, many (if not most) of them are descendants of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or Central American immigrants


#26

I’d reconsider my point on the Americas then, however I still do find that the European point stands. We do have much more in common with the Spanish men of the Americas than I did give credit.


#27

There’s also other ways you can serve besides the military. Some people have natural abilities and talents which could be better applied elsewhere; medicine, engineering, etc. Just because a 2nd gen immigrant doesn’t go into the military doesn’t mean that they don’t care about their homeland, it’s just that they may very well be better suited for another field.


#28

Well I feel it would be wrong to take someone who is an expert in medicine, egnineering, etc. away from their home country. That just creates brain drain.


#29

But if they are being persecuted (Like the Jewish scientists in Germany or intellectuals in Cambodia) then they weren’t being allowed to leverage their skills anyway, so you might as well take them. Besides, what happened to the whole self-interest thing?


#30

Ah, well I like self-interest, however you need to also ensure that your country isn’t turned into a Communist\Socialist hole in the wall, like Germany or Cambodia. If the US starts to turn into a Socialist country I’m not going to sail to Britain or Canada, I’m going to activily use my skills to help eliminate the threat.


#31

Fun fact, communist Cambodia was actually liberated by another communist country, Vietnam. And I use the term liberated because the govt. they installed, while still communist, was a vast improvement over Pol Pot’s genocidal regime


#32

I think anything is better than Pol Pot. That guy was nuts.


#33

Yeah. Fun fact (again): We and the Chinese (who were pissed at Vietnam) supported Pol Pot initially. However, we both pulled our support pretty quickly


#34

Another failure of interventionism.


#35

Its not like imperialism has been much better. Just look at Puerto Rico. Imperialism is very short sighted. Unless you can easily turn those colonies into core territories, they are worthless.


#36

Well you have to have a willing system, Congress stopped giving a damn and thought, “Gee willy we should focus on social issues rather than actual issues like infrastructure, taxes, and our territories.” Which is why we haven’t imposed more mandates for our territories to adapt our language or stuff like that. But you know, we need to figure out if a woman should be able to erase a person before they’re even born, real issues.


#37

We have tried converting them culturally. It has failed. And debates on human rights are real issues. Colonialism and imperialism are dead. Stop trying to revive them and get over it


#38

First of all, why does the government need to talk about private matters, and second of all, the world has seen more development when we are expanding, when we are proud, and when we have free exchange. The downfall of civilization is when pride of country is thrown out, free exchange is restricted, and expansion turns to inward facing policy, like legislation on restricting legal firearms, abortion, and trade.


#39

We were expanding during the Panic of 1893. Imperialism is not the cause of success, it is the symptom. Once you no longer have to deal with internal threats, you focus your expansion outwards.


#40

Well I can say that it is either we are dealing with an internal threat that must be dealt with, Socialists, or there are no Socialists and we should expand. Expantion does bring economic benefits to our nation and the protectorates, look at Guam, American Samoa, and the Philippines. These places wouldn’t be nearly as developed if it were not for us; and Guam and the Philippines would probably be under Japanese control too.