Ipsos, Perils of perception


#1

I found an interesting consulting firm that publishes results of surveys on issues bianually, ie the last one was in 2016

They hold many polls across the world and basically create an “ignorance” index, ie how common does the average individual get stats wrong, especially in their own country

Italy won 1st place in 2014 lol

On the topic of muslims, its quite funny, my favourite being turkey especially.



Source:

https://perils.ipsos.com/slides/

Ipsos uses their data from a 3rd party, Pew research centre, which is generally recognised to be reliable.


#2

French people think 40% of their country is muslim?

Jesus fucking christ.


#3

Well, considering how sharp le pens loss was, it doesnt seem to mean they have much issue with it.


#4

This doesn’t seem like a good conclusion. Le Pen still won over 37% of the vote, that’s quite incredible for someone of her political standpoint in a liberal democratic democracy.

Best to recognise that probably means quite a few people do have an issue with it.


#5

It is pretty unfortunate the way Islam has come to be viewed over the past 2 years or so


#6

In what sense?


#7

a large portion of the people who voted for her, voted for the same reasons trump won, they where the ones to suffer the effects of neo liberal policies, which is why protectionism is such a large part of her platform.

Geopolitics is pretty screwed up isnt it,


#8

Islam, primarily caused by Alt-Right type people spreading anti-Muslim propaganda plus Wahhabi assholes have taken Islam from being viewed as a brother religion to Christianity and Judaism (all have same God and follow the Old Testament) to being viewed as an invading and violent force of Europe.


#9

Or maybe it’s the fact a lot of Islamic cultural values directly contradict how western society operates, leading to a culture clash.


#10

This has not been the historical view of Christians and Jews at all.


#11

Not until the 21st century, no, but there was a period there when in the eyes of the majority in the late 2000s when they were viewed in a similar light (pre-refugee crisis)


#12

I would argue with that, but basically all I’m going to say is that there are extremists and moderates, and that even relatively religious Muslims often can exist in Western society. It’s simply if they do not want to follow the law when it becomes a problem


#13

I think ultra-orthodox Wahhabi Sunni Islam holds values directly contradictory with how western society operates, but I don’t think the same can be said for Islam as a whole or liberal forms of Islam.


#14

I mean more that the influence of any religion can lead to a problematic mix between that and politics, like the role some of perhaps what we’d consider “extreme” Christian values lead to difficulty in US political discourse.


#15

lmfao
about as brotherly as whites and blacks in the U.S.A.

whoever believed this was either historically ignorant or a hapless moron.


#16

Whynotboth.jpg


#17

No I know. Historically it was not true at all, but, by the late 2000s people were beginning to see Muslims in a better light. I’m not talking about all of history at all.

Also, depending on where you are in the USA, you find whites and blacks getting along.


#18

I don’t think refraining from killing one-another is the standard for brotherly affection.


#19

Actually go to the US and you will see what I mean.

If you are outside of the South you see people treating each other as people, and far less based upon race.


#20

lmfao I live in the US friendo

outside the South most people are ‘blind’ about race right up until it comes to deciding where they live, where they send their kids to school, avoiding “bad areas”, voting on policing policy, or voting on school funding.

tbh the difference I’ve seen between rural and city social interactions with strangers is less that of “treating people as people”, and more of “treating people equally as automatons you ignore as you get from point A to B as fast as possible”.