Should junkie beggars be arrested?


#61

yeah right, and what kind of employer wants these sort of people in the workforce? will you give them a job??no, thought not


#62

Which is exactly the reason I want rehabilitation programs for them…


#63

what kind of employer wants an ex addict or alcholic?


#64

One that wants a qualified employee who is no longer suffering the effects of being an addict?


#65

Quite difficult to stay straight and keep it together when you’ve lost everything and can’t even get the basics required to sustain a life because a bank needs proof of address to open an account for which a salary or benefits needs to be paid into. Or an address which the government require to send identification documents. Or even an address for correspondence regarding working and a job need to go. A PO box is a start but even that’s not fool proof - try telling the passport office that your PO is proof of residency!


#66

In my opinion, which could be wrong, these people should be given help, through compulsory ‘support groups’ behavioral therapy, compulsion to go to alcoholics/narcotics anonymous et cetera, it’s the only way to actually get rid of these poor people.

I think it’s sad to hear the stories of how they got there, it isn’t something I’d wish on to anyone, horrific lifestyle, lose any chance of a relationship, a family, a job really any comfortable way of living, but I guess that’s a jab at our society moreover.

I know it’d be unrealistic to try and combat ‘junkie beggars’ at a federal level, especially trying to convict them, when all they need is help. this is a much more local issue, and I think we should try and help them, not lock them out.


#67

most of these people are 30something men - so what can they do if they’ve spent 10 yrs on the streets or as addicts, what kind of skills will you give them seeing as usualy what’s on offer is just stuff like creative writing etc…


#68

that doesn’t mean you need to start taking drugs or drinking heavily, sheesh, what’s wrong with you people


#69

It’s an easy way to pass the time and drown your sorrows… one could say the same for well off students… so you’re not working and being a productive member of society no need to rub in the fact that mummy is paying for you to stay in a city centre crash pad…


#70

there’s plenty of ways to pass the time without money or drink - for ex. walking in the park, going to library, sitting in betting shop making 10pence bets etc…seriously, you seem to be excusing drug and alocohol addiction due to boredom


#71

Apparently not because elitists like you would then complain that homeless folk were making a mess of the park and ruining a good walk. It also isn’t really something you can do all the time…

That will be the ever decreasing number of public libraries then. Incidentally in areas such as Manchester, the homeless have been blanket banned from entering Public Libraries.

Oh good, supplement a habit of drinking or doing drugs with one of petty gambling… Some homeless do spend their times in betting shops hoping to make it big… but guess what those establishments are part of the larger problem, not the solution.

  1. I personally am not excusing any one’s actions. Its those individuals life to do what they want, same with you if you want to blow all your cash on booze, gambling and drugs crack on. 2. I don’t have to excuse addiction for boredom. Many Psychologists, support workers and medical professionals have written countless articles and reports on why Boredom is one of the number 1 causes of addicition and relapse. Its not an excuse its a recognised cause and effect.

#72

well so what, it’s just a fact of life and it’s up to you to deal with boredom how you see fit - no one else’s fault if you choose to get wasted over reading a good book


#73

the one’s who stink up the parks are the alcy’s - the sober ones tend to be anonymous


#74

I don’t understand how basic biology and dopamine activity works.


#75

you don’t understand a lot, that’s for sure


#76

you also don’t seem to understand if you’re replying to someone, you click the ‘reply’ button on their post, not the one at the bottom of the thread
im shocked you’ve managed to get as far as you have


#77

It’s up to them what skills they offer or obtain before or after their homeless and/or addict phases, and I’m gonna need evidence about those numbers you’re throwing around. Even if those were true, there are career options for those who have had no formal education above or even possibly below a high school diploma, and while not very widespread, those options do exist. Vocational or trade schools could also be viable options to gain some skill and value in the workforce. However, you have to still realize that around 44% of the homeless are actually employed, so there are people who are willing to take at least some of these people as employees, so I’d think the demand for their labor after cleaning themselves up would be comparable, or rather indistinguishable in size to the demand for labor from those that were never homeless or addicts. Not to mention, I would say a successful rehabilitation program would make these people relatively indistinguishable from their non-rehabilitated non-homeless/addict counterparts.


#78

Yes, we need more non violent criminals in our extremely overcrowded prisons.
/s


#79

“Criminals”


#80

these are just BS numbers thrown around by crooked charities such as Shelter- ie. they count people as ‘homeless’ if they’re not on the streets which is clearly absurd