Should the voting age be lowered to 16?


#6

@Sharpandquic you voted 16 years old. Are there reasons for this or is it just a gut feeling?


#7

So I haven’t been to South Korea in over 15 years so things might be different now, but I lived there until I was 7 years old and frequently communicate with my relatives there. Even beginning as toddlers, you’re given a lot more trust than the toddlers in America. You can stay home by yourself. You can take the city bus to run errands for your parents. You learn different languages and are expected to excel in academics and find your niche at a young age. So, yeah I would agree that generally the kids in South Korea are held up to MUCH higher expectations than the kids growing up in the US.

BUT I don’t think we can argue that the difference between kids in South Korea and US is strictly based on the level of expectations and responsibilities they have/don’t have. Creating more mature and accountable generations to come in the US is not going to be as easy as lifting restrictions on kids to give them permission to simply DO things. It’s not necessarily that kids in Korea have more freedom, but more so that their culture holds them more accountable. It’s a competitive society over there and everyone is encouraged to be well informed.


#8

I feel between 16 and 18, people tend not to change their political views too drastically, so I see it as if you’re going to let 18 year olds vote, you might as well let 16 year olds vote.

Additionally, I believe you should be able to drink, join the army, have adult sex, and vote at the same age, and I see 16 as the lowest age for that.


#9

Well for a start, if they commit a crime, they are sent to juvenile court rather than the main courts. They can’t get married (at least, not without permission, to the best of my knowledge), can’t drink, etc.

And 16 year olds definitely do not need adult status in Australia. As much as I admire the will for societal change that teens have, they should at least finish school before we talk about adult status.


#10

No. abolish voting and establish a Hoppean Monarchy.


#11

Do they pay any sort of taxes? In the US, there’s income tax if they work, toll, fuel and vehicle taxes if they drive, sales tax on items purchased.

There was a historical event called the Boston Tea Party during the American revolution that dumped huge shipments of tea into the harbor to protest [british] taxation without representation.

If you pay taxes, you should be able to vote. Either that or minors should be exempt from paying them.


#12

Yes, in the UK 16-17 year olds pay tax.
No taxation without representation is a really interesting American viewpoint on this issue which I hadn’t previously considered.

I see you have abstained from voting thusfar. Do you have a view on this beyond the taxation issue?


#13

I find the bus thing really surprising :open_mouth: I didnt even know that toddlers could even navigate buses in that way!? Wow.
Did you do this when you were younger?

You’re absolutely right - Such a big cultural change cant just happen overnight.
These things change time and the adults in society have got to change their attitudes too.


#14

I think it should stay 18. At least here in America, I don’t think most 16 year olds know enough/care enough about politics. Not to say that its any different as adults, but maybe since they are affected by whatever legislation at 18 (talking about stuff like taxes and insurance etc.) they might care about it then.


#15

Yeap, I think I was 6 when I took the city bus with my 2 year old brother just to go to this playground in another city LOL. I’m sure it’s not THAT common since the area is a lot more advanced right now but it’s not a peculiar thing to see young elementary school aged kids taking the buses on their own.


#16

16 year olds already inherit most adult rights in not just Britain but most of Europe. In many cases they are legal adults, often lacking one or 2 final rights that make it “complete”. The USA has one of these rights, alchohol consumption at 21, for instance


#17

I think it’s a bit different down here. It being the case that 16 year olds have most legal rights, would you argue that they be given the other rights and made legal adults?


#18

I think adulthood shouldn’t assigned at an arbitrary age but based on relative achievement of the person


#19

No, 18 is a good age. A decent sum of people are interested in politics and are educated enough, for the most part, to make reasonable choices.


#20

I would disagree, youth voting rates are often very low, youths vary incredibly often on how responsible and effective they are. There are 21 year olds who I wouldn’t trust with the age of consent and 16 years who have earned it, age is a terrible operational number that literally has no bearing on your development. People grow at different speeds


#21

They may, however testing for voting will never be used again; as it can be classified as racist or prejudiced against a minority.


#22

No.

As much as I hate to say it, but anyone under 18 is almost 100% unreliable. (this is just my opinion)
Why?

The internet has influenced people so much, that we, us, teens don’t really know what the truth is. Most of us follow a crowd and hope that we end up in the right place.

So therefor no, 16 & 17 year old’s should not be able to vote because of the influence from social media which is has a large target audience for teens.


#23

historically was used as such, literacy tests often included complicated questions that only professionals could answer, or quoting entire portions of the constitution verbatim, not an actual literacy test to show basic reading comprehension (which tbh is already performed by the fact the elector has to read the electoral instructions to vote in the first place) , coincidentally these tests would be far easier or absent in other areas (in other words it was outright suppression, they called it a literacy test to give themselves plausible deniability)


#24

It seems to me that old people are influenced in this way also… even to a greater extent. Its so common that the elderly are heavily influenced by fake news that it has practically become a meme. Should we ban them from voting too?

Maybe the answer isnt banning people from voting but actually teaching kids in school about the political history and about how news can be distorted or faked?


#25

I’m sorry, but I don’t think anyone under the age of 18 should be voting. Preferably 21. Reason being, many teens do a 180 when it comes to their political views because as they mature, they realize how unsustainable their old political views were. So no need to let people with a bad idea push it by being allowed to vote.