Siberia and the Reclamation by China


#1

#Does China want Siberia?
#Should it have Siberia?

In the 1991 Sino-Soviet Border Arrangement clarified any border disputes the two nations, but it doesn’t end the fact that Siberia is a large amount of land which could be populated by Chinese people very easily. Assuming that we could build the infrastructure needed to live there.

There could be things like Iron Mines, which are currently being forgotten about by Russia, or whether this would help to expand China’s Factory of the World. The fact is that Siberia is resource rich, which has a potential to be exploited. China already owns many of it, but they don’t own the territory. Such as the Chinese-owned factories.

They could use the Russian policy of handing out passports in the contested areas to “protect its citizens”. The Russians have tried that in a number of places, including Crimea.

The Chinese outnumber the Russians 10 to 1, and an attempt of invasion could only ever be stopped by Nuclear Weapons. Something that the Kremlin is undoubtedly afraid of.

Could a Eurasian Union be in order, which could bring all of these Eastern countries together, or would the economic integration simply destroy Russia?

Or should we be looking at the culture of Siberia, where they are quite similar. Where Russia actually fears a takeover of their culture by the Chinese. They recently created a Ministry of the Far-East, which is there to intrench the Russian speaking population, and has relocated 400 families. Russia fears that migration from China to Russia could further break their culture.

#Thoughts?


#2

Siberia is heavily settled by Russians and Ukrainians. Only like 10% are actually native Siberians (and a lot of those are Turkic Yakut). There isn’t that much of a risk of ethnic russians becoming mandarin speaking, pot noodle eating chinese.


#3

The fact is that there is only 7.4 million Russians in the entire Far-East versus 70 million in North East China.


#4

And are all these chinese going to flow into Siberia? It’s hardly a nice place to live. (even the USSR gave you more if you worked in Siberia as a worker).


#5

It doesn’t have to be a nice place to live there, it contains troves of natural resources. Something which is beneficial for China’s Factory of the World. The people don’t need to be consenting to be there, surely you agree with that? Many times throughout History China has forced people to move to another part of the country, and also killed millions of them when it failed.


#6

So does Niger.

But no one wants to live there.

It’s currently -21 in Irkutsk and that is in the very far south of Siberia near the Chinese border, night hasn’t arrived yet.

Northern Siberia is uninhabitable in winter.


#7

what application, website, w/e are you using for that? seems pretty nifty


#8

Ventusky.

Best weather website I’ve seen, has everything you need.

It was for aviation pilots only, but got released to the public in August.

Talking about the weather, it’s currently snowing here for the first time since 2012 so I’m taking my dog out. Bye noobs.


#9

Cheers, bruh. (I saw that shifty edit of a bad word out of that, mister.) It ain’t snowing here yet, but I’m hoping it will.


#10

No you didn’t

Also put the wind animation to dark fast motion and zoom out as far as possible for a nice magic mushroom effect.


#11

Regardless of whether they want to, people do live there. If China decides to take the land for the natural resources, the Chinese will live there in order to extract them.


#12

If they’re profitable.

The resources there aren’t. Hence why even Russia whose wages are low find it uncompetitive to bother. Most of the oil is in far western Siberia, other resources are just metals.

Also, Siberian resource composition is largely the same as China.

Except for platinum, which is abundant in Siberia and highly prized and in demand.


#13

Isn’t Siberia where Russia gets it’s energy? That energy goes to most of Europe. Without it, Russia would suffer enormously. Surely that shows it’s profitable?


#14

Regardless of the economics, Chinese annexation of Siberia isn’t geo-politically appealing. Tibet, for example, is of great geo-political importance to the Chinese, as it establishes a buffer between mainland China and India; it also means India doesn’t control that land. I don’t see any geo-political advantage for China to annex Siberia.


#15

not much oil in siberia

the purple cock-like shape is the real Siberia as defined by any geographic association. the lighter purple is what most people include when they talk of siberia, officially called the Russian “Far East”. The two differ greatly in plants, species, weather etc.

Regardless, almost all oil in Russia is in the “Russian Federation” on that map, officially called “Old Russia” or just merely “West of Ural”


#16

Mate are you colour blind


#17

Isn’t that just the official name for Russia?


#18

“on that map”

russia’s political system is too complex anyway. some of it belongs to the federal government (st petersburg, moscow, crimea), some of it is a state like in the us, some of it is like a county in the uk and some of it is like a member of the EU. the level of autonomy is radically different and there’s no overlapping.

that is literally purple, i raise that to u


#19

Most comes from the weird tribe area (Khanty-Mansi) that is now mostly russian.


#20

Think my browser fucked up lol