Siberia and the Reclamation by China


#21

You just do not understand.

Putin and the Kremlin deliberately destroy the Russians and betray Siberia to China. They have money in Hong Kong which is now under the control of China and in Shanghai.

In Siberia, there are many fields that are simply not developed, but there are no less than there in the Urals.

Having received their Chinese will conquer the whole world. They will not stop - it is necessary to study the ideology of China to understand it. And the conquered peoples are waiting for the same thing as the Manchu, Uigur, Tibetans - a slow decline in the number and “retraining camp.”

We Russians understand that many countries have claims to us. Although many are not fair - our rulers are guilty, who were not Russians by nationality, such as Stalin - Georgians, Nikolay 2 - half German and Dane.

If you don’t see us that way you think that we shouldn’t have our own state, then give us to Japan. We will accept their customs and practices. And the Japanese will spare us and will not destroy as the Chinese.

If you want our death, then you will be the next after us. Your descendants. We will die, and becoming stronger China will destroy you.


#22

I myself have entertained the possibility of an eventual Russian collapse and partition between NATO and China. Russia’s backed itself into a corner with Putin’s aggressive strategy. The annexation of Crimea alone cost Russia around 10% of their GDP due to tariffs and occupation costs. Putin’s had his eyes on the Baltics for a while, hence why he’s been so keen to fracture the EU and NATO through the funding of far-right anti-EU nationalist parties, but this has not had the desired effect so far.

Russia’s reliance on raw resources and fossil fuels in a global economy increasingly based around consumer goods, mass-exports, and renewables has left the former stranded. Their population has continued to shrink while their economy has remained stagnant. This population issue has also afflicted the EU and even China, but while the former has solved this through a steady stream of immigrants (of which there will be no shortage coming to seek opportunity in nations such as France and Germany) and the latter has begun to do so by pretty much buying the entirety of East Africa, Russia lacks the economic strength to either encourage mass immigration or create new consumer markets overseas for the export of goods. This economic rut is compounded by Putin’s insistance on an aggressive and expansionist foriegn policy, one which has so far achieved mixed results. If China and NATO can isolate Russia from potential allies such as Iran, then Russia could very well face a repeat of their 1989-1991 collapse; the difference is that when that collapse happened, Russia lost their client states in Europe. Now, with only a handful of client states in Central Asia and no more than a few in Europe, another collapse could mean the disintegration of Russia itself. In the ensuing chaos, NATO and China could justify an invasion in order to secure any nuclear weapons in the collapsing nation (and the potential threat that might pose), partitioning Russia in the process (with Siberia going to China and an array of Central Asian states, such as Kazakhstan, which would now become their clients; and with Western Russia likely being split up by NATO into a collection of smaller client states).

Of course, while I sincerely doubt that Putin wants this to happen, and a Russian partition would likely be the most extreme scenario, the collapse of Russia’s economy and a subsequent loss of their “world power” status is a very real possibility at this point. If Russia wants to avoid this, they will need to find friends and begin modernizing their economy soon, otherwise such a collapse will go from a possibility to an inevitability