Why Shouldn't Children Vote?


#1

As the title states - I’m interested to see what your reasonings are.

As the strange person I am, I’m pretty much against democracy. However, if it is to be used, I see a minimum voting age as unnecessary.

I’ll (attempt to) counter all arguments in favour of a minimum voting age should they be put forward.


#2

Because parents will probably manipulate their young kids to vote for whatever party they support. Thus instead of being their individual vote, it’s just a second vote for their parents(s).


#3

Because children’ aren’t mature participants in society.


#4

[QUOTE=“Sir Mobutu of Devonshire, post: 406188, member: 1164”]Because parents will probably manipulate their young kids to vote for whatever party they support. Thus instead of being their individual vote, it’s just a second vote for their parents(s).[/QUOTE]

  1. Evidence pls
  2. If the political system started giving more weight to a family of five than to a family of two, it would be more sensible.

#5

Because their cognitive abilities are too limited, and their behavior can be too widely influenced by close figures of authority (parents, teachers, etc…)


#6

[QUOTE=“CrearBIn, post: 406189, member: 4489”]Because children’ aren’t mature participants in society.[/QUOTE]
Voting for over 18’s isn’t competency based either.


#7

[QUOTE=“BlackHole, post: 406192, member: 1253”]Because their cognitive abilities are too limited[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406193, member: 3675”]Voting for over 18’s isn’t competency based either.[/QUOTE]

and their behavior can be too widely influenced by close figures of authority (parents, teachers, etc…)

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406190, member: 3675”]1. Evidence pls
2. If the political system started giving more weight to a family of five than to a family of two, it would be more sensible.[/QUOTE]


#8

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406190, member: 3675”]Evidence pls[/QUOTE]
Do I really need to prove that the vast majority of parents would influence who their child votes for or even dictate who they are to vote for?[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406190, member: 3675”]If the political system started giving more weight to a family of five than to a family of two, it would be more sensible.[/QUOTE]
Are you sure you want to give more weight to my future family?


#9

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406193, member: 3675”]Voting for over 18’s isn’t competency based either.[/QUOTE]
Because generally speaking 18 year olds are more competent than a 6 year old child.


#10

[QUOTE=“Sir Mobutu of Devonshire, post: 406195, member: 1164”]Do I really need to prove that the vast majority of parents would influence who their child votes for or even dictate who they are to vote for?[/QUOTE]
Well yes. My own views are quite different from my parents - there is no way I’d vote for the same party as my mother.

Are you sure you want to give more weight to my future family?

If we’re living in a democracy, then each person should have equal weighting (though I support prisoners losing voting rights).


#11

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406194, member: 3675”][/QUOTE]
I it were just me I would make 18+ voting competence based. And while it’s not, the idea is that we know for certain that most children will have inferior cognitive ability to adults and incomplete knowledge of the world, the age limit is kind of an all purpose wide gapped competence filter.

And no, it doesn’t make sense for a family that have more children to have more weight in voting, because the idea of democracy is to give each one a voice on how they wanna be governed, children are considered not mature enough to have that kind of opinion yet and as such they aren’t given the right to vote.


#12

[QUOTE=“CrearBIn, post: 406196, member: 4489”]Because generally speaking 18 year olds are more competent than a 6 year old child.[/QUOTE]
And? You don’t even need to know what an election is to be able to vote in it, as long as your over 18.

If you want to make it competency based, then say. But I know I’m much more politically knowledgeable than most adults, and I can’t vote, yet they can.


#13

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406199, member: 3675”]And? You don’t even need to know what an election is to be able to vote in it, as long as your over 18.

If you want to make it competency based, then say. But I know I’m much more politically knowledgeable than most adults, and I can’t vote, yet they can.[/QUOTE]
You also have to, in the united states, have taken 11 years of compulsory education, of which civic education is a required part, which teaches you about government, your obligations as a citizen, etc. These classes are necessary to be a well-informed voter.


#14

[QUOTE=“Jamietuts, post: 406197, member: 3675”]Well yes. My own views are quite different from my parents - there is no way I’d vote for the same party as my mother.[/QUOTE]
But say you were 10. If your mother was actively encouraging you to vote say Labour (I don’t know what she votes for but using an example) or even telling you explicitly you must vote Labour. Then surely you would not vote for them? And how is that any different from corrupt politicians directly paying people to vote for them or using militias to force them to?


#15

If you’re going to have a system as retarded as democracy, you may as well go the whole way and let people who can barely use a pencil make their mark on the ballot paper.


#16

No, most young kids have no interest in politics and therefore, wouldn’t be so democratic. Also, I’m pretty sure that the parents will just tell them who to vote for, allowing basically, one man two votes and will not be democratic.


#17

Letting people vote is a risky business in the first place, letting any random kid vote would be the literal definition of mob rule.


#18

Because a populist party promising unicorns will govern the country and threaten to cripple national and economic security.


#19

No, they’re not mature enough. The only reason we let 18 year olds vote is because they can be forced into the armed services.


#20

Because children are more often than not biased towards the political beliefs of either one or both of the parents until around ages 13-15. This means that the demographics with the highest amount of children will be overrepresented on the final result.